Admirals of the Broad Blue (Part 3)

Posted by on May 22, 2012 in Blog | 0 comments

Admirals of the Broad Blue (Part 3)

Written by Craig Gallant | Tags:

As you know from this week’s introduction, the focal battle this week is between the dreaded overlords of the New World, the Dragon Lords, and the eternal warriors, the Thaniras Elves. While we were playing out this battle, another battle was being waged on an adjacent table between Ian’s Ralgard and Chris’ Dragon Lords. Jeremy and his Imperial Humans were left off the table as he played the role of photographer for the rest of us, but he was a good sport, took some great pictures of both tables, and knew he would be the featured opponent in the final battle.

The Ralgard and Dragon Lords

The Ralgard and Dragon Lords

To give you a little background regarding the local campaign, and how you might want to work with your group to put together your own, we should speak for a moment about the social dynamic under which we labour. There were several local folks itching to get involved, but for one reason or another had to miss this one out. Matt, our local Orc Raiders player, was involved with another campaign. Brian, our Iron Dwarves player, was eager but his fleet wasn’t one of the featured factions this time around, so instead I gave him a Guardian Class Floating Citadel to paint up for today’s blog entry. Ryan, another of our Uncharted Seas players, who plays Shroud Mages, found himself ‘off-faction’ this time around, but was more than happy to step in for several games.

Iron Dwarves Guardian Class Floating Citadel

Iron Dwarves Guardian Class Floating Citadel

The way all of these things interact within the campaign is something you need to put a little thought into before entering into the Cauldron of Silence campaign. If you have a total of four players who want to play, then you’re all set. Each of you can play whatever fleets you want (although I’d suggest, if possible, you play with the factions of focus this time around), and you play your games amongst the four of you as evenly as you can. Each of you should play the other factions at least once, and there will, of course, be one of your three opponents who will play a second time. At least, that’s what my staff mathematicians say… I’m not so good at math myself.

Thaniras Elves

Thaniras Elves

Record how many Victory Points you earned in each battle. Multiply Mission One Victory Points by 25, and that’s how many Campaign Victory Points you earned. For Mission Two, multiply your total Victory Points by 50 to find your Campaign Points. For Missions Three and Four you will use the straight up Victory Points earned in both missions. Whoever earned the most Campaign Victory Points after the four games is the winner. Bragging rights and drinks on them!

However, what if you’ve got more than four guys who want to play? For instance, we had six to start with. Well, as long as you’ve got an even number of players who want to be involved, you’re still going to be all set. Just make sure everyone gets their games in and you’ll be good to go. This small campaign is designed so that any number of players can play as long as they are all getting their games in. The Victory Points structure should be granular enough that a tie is highly unlikely. You might have to play a tie-breaker in the unlikely event that one occurs, or you might even want to designate a range of victories. Say, within 200 Victory Points is a tie and must be broken with a fifth game. Any excuse to get another game in, right?

Shallows

Shallows

What if you have an odd number of players, or if you have a player who cannot make it one week? Well, these are the things that every campaign organizer has to deal with. There are a couple ways to counter these issues. You can allow your players to play multiple games and only count the best result. This allows odd-men-out to play games also, and so having an even number doesn’t matter. You might want to structure this a little bit, however, as the danger here is that all of your players will play until they have a win before moving on. You might allow, for instance, the ‘odd-man-out’ to play the person who scored the lowest in that mission, and thus give them a chance of redemption. Or you might put a time limit on getting your games in. Players with the stamina to play multiple battles will be rewarded with theoretically higher scores (although dividing total VP’s by the number of battles played evens this out), and everyone who wants to play will have a chance. The ultimate goal here is for YOU to tailor this to YOUR group, so that you all have a highly enjoyable experience. So go with whatever makes the most sense.

Sargasso

Sargasso

What about the players who cannot complete a mission, for whatever reason? The easiest solution, of course, is that they get zero Victory Points and no Strategic Benefits moving into the next battle. However, often that puts them at a disadvantage out of proportion with having missed a single game. For instance, whereas if you win Mission One you start with a 2 VP token already in your possession, if you didn’t get a chance to play, then you’re starting the game 2 VP down. In that instance often we’ll allow the laggard who didn’t get the game in to roll a die, and on a 5+ count it as if he won, and so give him the bonus. We don’t do this often, but if we all agree, it’s a quick and fast solution that doesn’t punish folks for having busy lives.

Reef and Shallow

Reef and Shallow

And so that’s how we’re dealing with little things like victory, defeat, and absenteeism in our campaign. We’ve really been blessed with a dynamic and excited group of guys, though, so it’s very seldom a problem getting those games in.